National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2016 Version 1.0

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7 - Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations

These occupations include trades supervisors and contractors, construction and mechanical tradespersons, operators of transportation and heavy equipment and trades helpers. These occupations are found in a wide range of industrial sectors, with many in the construction and transportation industries.

This category includes most of the apprenticeable trades, including all those related to the construction industry. Other occupations in this category usually require completion of college or vocational education programs combined with on-the-job training. Helpers obtain training on the job site. Progression to supervisory positions or self-employed contractor status is possible with experience. There is limited mobility or transferability of skills among occupations in this category due to specific apprenticeship, training and licensing requirements for most occupations.

73 - Maintenance and equipment operation trades

This major group comprises occupations in maintenance and equipment operation trades, which usually require more than two years of apprenticeship or on-the-job training in the trade. It includes contractors and supervisors, maintenance trades and heavy equipment and transport operators; machinery and transportation equipment mechanics (except motor vehicles); automotive service technicians; other mechanics and related repairers; train crew operations occupations; crane operators, drillers and blasters; and printing press operators and other trades and related occupations, not elsewhere classified.

733 - Other mechanics and related repairers

This minor group includes oil and solid fuel heating mechanics; appliance servicers and repairers; electrical mechanics; motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle and other related mechanics; and other small engine and small equipment repairers. They are employed by heating systems installation and service companies; repair shops, appliance service companies and repair departments of retail and wholesale establishments; independent electrical repair shops, service shops of electrical equipment manufacturers and maintenance departments of manufacturing companies; service shops of motorcycle dealers and retailers; other dealer service shops; and independent service establishments; or they may be self-employed.

7331 - Oil and solid fuel heating mechanics

Oil and solid fuel heating mechanics install and maintain oil, coal and wood heating systems in residential and commercial buildings. They are employed by heating systems installation and service companies.

  • Illustrative example(s)

    • furnace installer and repairer (except gas)
    • heating service mechanic
    • heating systems technician
    • oil burner installer
    • oil burner mechanic
    • oil burner mechanic apprentice
    • wood burner installer

    All examples

  • Exclusion(s)

    • Gas fitters (See 7253 Gas fitters)
    • Supervisors of oil and solid fuel heating mechanics (See 7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades)
  • Main duties

    Oil and solid fuel heating mechanics perform some or all of the following duties:

    • Read and interpret drawings or specifications to determine work to be performed
    • Lay out oil burner heating system components and assemble components using hand and power tools
    • Install oil burner components such as thermostats, motors, piping and safety devices, and connect to fuel supply, ventilation and electrical system
    • Test installed unit and adjust controls for proper functioning
    • Troubleshoot and repair malfunctioning oil burners, and their components and controls
    • Install, maintain and repair coal and wood heating systems
    • Perform scheduled maintenance service on oil and solid fuel heating systems.
  • Employment requirements

    • Completion of secondary school and training courses or a vocational program is usually required.
    • Completion of a three- to four-year apprenticeship program
      or
      A combination of over four years of work experience and industry courses in heating systems installation and repair is usually required for trade certification.
    • Oil heat system technician trade certification is compulsory in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick and is available, but voluntary, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, British Columbia, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.
    • Red Seal endorsement is also available to qualified oil heat system technicians upon successful completion of the interprovincial Red Seal examination.
  • Additional information

    • The Red Seal endorsement allows for interprovincial mobility.
    • Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.
7332 - Appliance servicers and repairers

Appliance servicers and repairers service and repair domestic and commercial appliances. They are employed by repair shops, appliance service companies and repair departments of retail and wholesale establishments, or they may be self-employed.

  • Illustrative example(s)

    • appliance service technician
    • appliance service technician apprentice
    • appliance servicer
    • commercial foodservice appliance technician
    • commercial laundry appliance technician
    • dishwasher repairer
    • refrigerator repairer
    • service technician - electrical appliances
    • service technician - gas appliances
    • stove repairer
    • vacuum cleaner repairer
    • washing machine servicer
    • window air conditioner repairer

    All examples

  • Exclusion(s)

    • Electronic service technicians (household and business equipment) (See 2242 Electronic service technicians (household and business equipment))
    • Gas fitters (See 7253 Gas fitters)
    • Other small engine and small equipment repairers (See 7335 Other small engine and small equipment repairers)
    • Refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics (See 7313 Heating, refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics)
    • Residential and commercial installers and servicers (See 7441 Residential and commercial installers and servicers)
    • Supervisors of appliance servicers and repairers (See 7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades)
  • Main duties

    Small electrical appliance servicers and repairers perform some or all of the following duties:

    • Repair small electrical appliances, such as lawn and garden equipment and power tools
    • Consult customer or refer to work order to establish nature of the appliance malfunction
    • Observe operation of appliance and conduct voltage, resistance and other tests using electrical test equipment
    • Refer to schematic drawings or product manuals and replace or repair parts or components using hand tools and soldering equipment
    • Prepare estimates and written accounts of work performed.

    Major appliance repairers/technicians perform some or all of the following duties:

    • Repair major electrical or gas appliances, such as domestic and commercial dishwashing equipment, stoves, laundry equipment and refrigerators in customer's home, in customer's place of business or in repair shop
    • Consult customer or refer to work order to establish nature of the appliance malfunction
    • Diagnose faults by checking controls, condensers, timer sequences, fans and other components using test equipment such as meters and gauges to measure resistance, current, voltage, pressure, temperature, flue gases and flow rates
    • Refer to schematic diagrams or product manuals and disassemble appliance using hand tools
    • Use shop equipment and specialized diagnostic and programming apparatus to repair, adjust and reprogram appliances
    • Replace components and subcomponents and reassemble appliance using hand tools and soldering and brazing equipment
    • Prepare estimates and written accounts of work performed
    • May plan service routes.
  • Employment requirements

    • Completion of secondary school and training courses or a vocational program is usually required.
    • Small appliance repairers usually require some specialized college or high school courses or several months of on-the-job training.
    • Major appliance repairers/technicians require some secondary school education and completion of a college program in appliance repair
      or
      Completion of a three- or four-year apprenticeship program in appliance repair.
    • Appliance service technician, or appliance serviceperson, trade certification is compulsory in Alberta and available, but voluntary, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario, British Columbia, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.
    • A provincial gas fitter licence, or gas appliance technician certificate, may be required for gas appliance service technicians.
    • Red Seal endorsement is also available to qualified appliance service technicians upon successful completion of the interprovincial Red Seal examination.
  • Additional information

    • The Red Seal endorsement allows for interprovincial mobility.
    • Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.
7333 - Electrical mechanics

Electrical mechanics maintain, test, rebuild and repair electric motors, transformers, switchgear and other electrical apparatus. They are employed by independent electrical repair shops, service shops of electrical equipment manufacturers and maintenance departments of manufacturing companies.

  • Illustrative example(s)

    • armature winder repairer
    • coil winder and repairer
    • electric motor systems technician
    • electrical mechanic
    • electrical mechanic apprentice
    • electrical rewind mechanic
    • electrical transformer repairer
    • industrial motor winder-repairer
    • power transformer repairer
    • transformer repairer

    All examples

  • Exclusion(s)

    • Aircraft electrical mechanics (See 2244 Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors)
    • Assemblers, fabricators and inspectors, industrial electrical motors and transformers (See 9525 Assemblers, fabricators and inspectors, industrial electrical motors and transformers)
    • Industrial electricians (See 7242 Industrial electricians)
    • Supervisors of electrical mechanics (See 7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades)
  • Main duties

    Electrical mechanics perform some or all of the following duties:

    • Test and observe electrical, electronic and mechanical components and systems using testing and measuring instruments
    • Troubleshoot and repair electric motors, transformers, switchgear, generators and other electro-mechanical equipment
    • Replace or recondition shafts, bearings, commutators and other components
    • Wind, assemble and install various types of coils for electric motors or transformer
    • Perform static or dynamic balancing of armatures or rotors by welding, brazing or soldering electrical connections and by aligning and adjusting parts
    • Test and repair or replace faulty wiring or components in electrical switchgear
    • Test repaired motors, transformers, switchgear or other electrical apparatus to ensure proper performance
    • Perform some machining to recondition or modify shafts, commutators or other parts
    • Perform on-site servicing and repair.

    Electrical mechanics may specialize in working with certain types of apparatus, such as electric motors or transformers, or in performing certain functions, such as winding coils.

  • Employment requirements

    • Completion of secondary school and training courses or a vocational program is usually required.
    • Completion of a four-year apprenticeship program
      or
      A combination of over four years of work experience and industry courses in electrical mechanics is usually required for trade certification.
    • Trade certification as an electric motor system technician is available, but voluntary, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, British Columbia, the Yukon and Nunavut.
    • Electrical motor and equipment repairer - winding trade certification is available, but voluntary in Quebec.
    • Electrical motor system technician (electrical utility) trade certification is available, but voluntary in New Brunswick.
    • Red Seal endorsement is also available to qualified electric motor system technicians upon successful completion of the interprovincial Red Seal examination.
  • Additional information

    • The Red Seal endorsement allows for interprovincial mobility.
    • Although specialization may occur, workers in this unit group are required to be proficient in repairing all electrical apparatus.
    • Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.
7334 - Motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle and other related mechanics

Mechanics in this unit group test, repair and service motorcycles, motor scooters, snowmobiles, outboard motors, forklifts and all-terrain vehicles. They are employed by service shops of motorcycle dealers and retailers and by independent service establishments.

  • Illustrative example(s)

    • all-terrain vehicle repairer
    • forklift mechanic
    • industrial truck repairer
    • motor boat mechanic
    • motor scooter repairer
    • motorcycle mechanic
    • motorcycle mechanic apprentice
    • outboard motor mechanic
    • snowmobile repairer

    All examples

  • Exclusion(s)

    • Other small engine and small equipment repairers (See 7335 Other small engine and small equipment repairers)
    • Supervisors of motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle and other related mechanics (See 7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades)
  • Main duties

    Mechanics in this unit group perform some or all of the following duties:

    • Review work orders and discuss work to be performed with supervisor
    • Inspect and test engine and other mechanical components using test devices to diagnose and isolate faults
    • Adjust, repair or replace mechanical or electrical system parts and components using hand tools and equipment
    • Test and adjust repaired systems for proper performance
    • Perform scheduled maintenance service on equipment
    • Advise customers on work performed and general condition of equipment
    • Determine estimates of repair cost
    • May repair and rebuild hoisting mechanism and other mechanical systems on industrial trucks and forklifts.
  • Employment requirements

    • Completion of secondary school and training courses or a vocational program is usually required.
    • For motorcycle mechanics, completion of a three- to four-year apprenticeship program
      or
      A combination of over three years of work experience and high school or college courses in motorcycle repair is usually required to be eligible for trade certification.
    • Motorcycle mechanic trade certification is compulsory in Ontario and Alberta and available, but voluntary, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and British Columbia.
    • Other mechanics in this unit group may require several years of on-the-job training.
    • Red Seal endorsement is also available to qualified motorcycle mechanics upon successful completion of the interprovincial Red Seal examination.
  • Additional information

    • The Red Seal endorsement allows for interprovincial mobility.
    • There is mobility among some occupations in this unit group.
    • Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.
7335 - Other small engine and small equipment repairers

Workers in this unit group test, repair and service small gasoline and diesel-powered engines and equipment, such as garden tractors, lawn mowers and other related equipment. They are employed by dealer service shops and by independent service establishments.

  • Illustrative example(s)

    • air-cooled engine mechanic
    • gasoline powered lawn mower repairer
    • lawn and garden equipment technician
    • small engine technician
    • small equipment mechanic apprentice
    • small equipment repairer

    All examples

  • Exclusion(s)

    • Appliance servicers and repairers (See 7332 Appliance servicers and repairers)
    • Motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle and other related mechanics (See 7334 Motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle and other related mechanics)
    • Supervisors of small engine and equipment mechanics (See 7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades)
  • Main duties

    Workers in this unit group perform some or all of the following duties:

    • Review work orders and discuss work to be performed with supervisor
    • Inspect and test engines and other mechanical components using test devices to diagnose and isolate faults
    • Adjust, repair or replace mechanical or electrical system parts and components using hand tools and equipment
    • Test and adjust repaired equipment for proper performance
    • Perform scheduled maintenance service on equipment
    • Advise customers on work performed and general condition of equipment
    • Determine estimates of repair cost.
  • Employment requirements

    • Completion of secondary school and training courses or a vocational program is usually required.
    • Completion of a three- to four-year apprenticeship program in small engine or equipment repair
      or
      A combination of several years of work experience and high school or college courses in small engine or equipment repair are usually required for trade certification.
    • Small engine or equipment mechanic trade certification is available, but voluntary, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario and Nunavut.
    • Inboard/outboard mechanic trade certification is available, but voluntary, in Ontario and British Columbia.
    • Outdoor power equipment technician trade certification, for specified types of equipment, is available, but voluntary, in Manitoba, Alberta, British Columbia, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.
  • Additional information

    • Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.
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