Variant of the National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2021 Version 1.0 for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

C - Other than STEM Occupations

Other than STEM occupations (Non-STEM) refer to occupations requiring knowledge and competencies in one or more areas (usually related to the occupation) other than STEM to complete central functions of a job. Fundamental STEM knowledge may be used to varying degrees to support tasks. This category includes a wide variety of occupational areas such as senior management, law, culture, recreation, operations, trades and sales. These occupational areas may require knowledge and/or expertise acquired through formal and non-formal education or training.

C2 - Other than STEM - Natural and applied sciences and related occupations

Other than STEM occupations (Non-STEM) in natural and applied sciences and their related occupations, refer to occupations requiring knowledge and competencies in one or more areas (usually related to the occupation) other than STEM to complete central functions of a job. Fundamental STEM knowledge may be used to varying degrees to support tasks. These occupational areas may require knowledge and/or expertise acquired through formal and non-formal education or training.

22113 - Conservation and fishery officers

Conservation and fishery officers, inspectors and observers enforce federal and provincial regulations established for the protection of fish, wildlife and other natural resources and collect and relay information on resource management. They are employed by federal and provincial government departments.

  • Illustrative example(s)

    • conservation officer
    • fish and wildlife officer
    • fishery officer
    • forest ranger - wildlife management
    • game officer
    • game warden
    • natural resources officer
    • park ranger

    All examples

  • Exclusion(s)

    • Biological technologists and technicians (See 22110 Biological technologists and technicians)
    • Fish inspector (See 22111 Agricultural and fish products inspectors)
    • Forestry technologists and technicians (See 22112 Forestry technologists and technicians)
  • Main duties

    This group performs some or all of the following duties:

    • Generate public awareness of fish and wildlife conservation and regulations
    • Conduct patrols by truck, aircraft, boat, or on foot, to ensure compliance with the provincial and federal statutes relating to fish, wildlife and the environment
    • Investigate complaints, arrest violators, prepare briefs and present evidence in court
    • Issue licences, export documents and special permits and collect royalties assessed on fish, wildlife and timber resources
    • Implement and supervise approved techniques in preventing or overcoming damage caused by wildlife
    • Perform resource protection duties, such as inspecting fishing gear and equipment and monitoring fishing activities for compliance with regulations
    • Gather resource data by making inventories of fish, collecting water samples and assisting biologists in scientific research
    • Supervise or provide firearms safety training courses and trapper education courses.
  • Employment requirements

    • Completion of a college program in renewable resources management, environmental conservation or a related discipline is usually required.
    • On-the-job training and courses related to law enforcement and resource management are provided.
    • A class-5 driver's licence, pesticide applicator's licence and explosives licence may be required.
  • Additional information

    • Progression to senior and supervisory positions is possible with experience.

22311 - Electronic service technicians (household and business equipment)

Electronic service technicians service and repair household and business electronic equipment such as audio and video systems, computers and peripherals, office equipment and other consumer electronic equipment and assemblies. They are employed by electronic service and retail establishments, by wholesale distributors and within service departments of electronic manufacturing companies. Apprentices are also included in this unit group.

  • Illustrative example(s)

    • alarm system technician
    • audio-video service technician
    • computer service technician
    • electronic products field service technician
    • electronic service technician apprentice
    • electronic service technician supervisor
    • office equipment service technician
    • photocopy machine technician
    • radio and television service technician
    • satellite antenna servicer

    All examples

  • Exclusion(s)

    • Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians (See 22310 Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians)
    • Telecommunications equipment installation and cable television service technicians (See 72205 Telecommunications equipment installation and cable television service technicians)
  • Main duties

    This group performs some or all of the following duties:

    • Install, maintain and repair household and business electronic equipment, such as televisions, radios, DVD and blueray players, projectors, stereo equipment, photocopiers, computers and peripherals
    • Inspect and test electronic equipment, components and assemblies using multimeters, circuit testers, oscilloscopes, logic probes and other electronic test instruments, tools and equipment
    • Diagnose and locate circuit, component and equipment faults
    • Adjust, align, replace or repair electronic equipment, assemblies and components following equipment manuals and schematics, and using soldering tools and other hand and power tools
    • Complete work orders, test and maintenance reports
    • May supervise other electronic equipment service technicians.
  • Employment requirements

    • Completion of a two- to three-year college program in electronics
      or
      Completion of a four-year apprenticeship program in electronic servicing and repair
      or
      Completion of high school or college courses in electronics and on-the-job training is required.
    • Trade certification for electronics technicians (consumer products) is available, but voluntary, in Ontario, British Columbia and the Yukon.
  • Additional information

    • Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.

22313 - Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors

Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors install, adjust, repair and overhaul aircraft instrument, electrical or avionics systems on aircraft. This unit group also includes avionics inspectors who inspect instrument, electrical and avionics systems following assembly, modification, repair or overhaul. They are employed by aircraft manufacturing, maintenance, repair and overhaul establishments and by airlines and other aircraft operators. Apprentices are also included in this unit group.

  • Illustrative example(s)

    • aircraft electrical technician
    • aircraft electrician
    • aircraft instrument inspector
    • aircraft instrument mechanic
    • aircraft instrument technician
    • aircraft maintenance engineer (AME) - avionics
    • avionics inspector
    • avionics maintenance technician
    • avionics technician
    • instrument overhaul and repair mechanic - avionics

    All examples

  • Exclusion(s)

    • Aircraft assemblers and aircraft assembly inspectors (See 93200 Aircraft assemblers and aircraft assembly inspectors)
    • Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors (See 72404 Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors)
    • Airworthiness inspector (See 22231 Engineering inspectors and regulatory officers)
    • Electrical mechanics (See 72422 Electrical mechanics)
    • Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics (See 22312 Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics)
  • Main duties

    This group performs some or all of the following duties:

    Aircraft instrument mechanics and technicians

    • Repair and overhaul, install, calibrate and test aircraft instruments.

    Aircraft electrical mechanics and technicians

    • Repair and overhaul, modify, install and test aircraft electrical systems and equipment.

    Avionics mechanics and technicians

    • Troubleshoot, repair and overhaul, test, modify, install and inspect aircraft electronic systems and components including communications, navigation, and autoflight equipment.

    Avionics inspectors

    • Inspect and test aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics systems and ensure that the installation, maintenance, repair and overhaul of these systems meet Transport Canada and company standards of performance and safety.

    Aircraft mechanics and technicians who work in repair and overhaul shops service and test electrical, electronic and instrument components.

    Avionics mechanics and technicians who work in maintenance hangars troubleshoot, repair, install and inspect aircraft systems and components.

  • Employment requirements

    • Aircraft instrument and avionics mechanics and technicians require completion of a two- to three-year college program in avionics or electronics.
    • Aircraft electrical mechanics and technicians require completion of a college program as an electrical or electronic technician.
    • Four years of on-the-job or company apprenticeship training is required for all mechanics and technicians in this unit group.
    • Avionics inspectors require completion of a two- to three-year college program in avionics or electronics
      and
      three to five years of experience as an avionics mechanic or technician.
    • Avionics inspectors, mechanics and technicians who sign maintenance releases and certify airworthiness require an Aircraft Maintenance Engineer's (AME) licence (category E - avionics) issued by Transport Canada.
    • Industry certification is available from the Canadian Council for Aviation & Aerospace (CCAA) for some occupations in this unit group.
    • In Quebec, membership in the regulatory body for professional technologists is required to use the title "Professional Technologist."
  • Additional information

    • Avionics inspectors, maintenance technicians and mechanics may acquire further endorsements to their AME licence allowing them to inspect and certify a broader range of aircraft and avionics systems.
    • An AME licence can be obtained by fulfilling the education and training requirements as stated above and passing Transport Canada AME examinations.
    • Progression to supervisory positions within specific areas of expertise is possible with experience.
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