Economic Regions - Variant of SGC 2016

Definitions

Census agglomeration

See the definition of census metropolitan area.

Census agricultural region

Census agricultural regions (CARs) are composed of groups of adjacent census divisions.

Census consolidated subdivision

A census consolidated subdivision (CCS) is a group of adjacent census subdivisions within the same census division. Generally, the smaller, more densely-populated census subdivisions (towns, villages, etc.) are combined with the surrounding, larger, more rural census subdivision, in order to create a geographic level between the census subdivision and the census division.

Census division

Census division (CD) is the general term for provincially legislated areas (such as county and regional district) or their equivalents. Census divisions are intermediate geographic areas between the province/territory level and the municipality (census subdivision).

Census metropolitan area

A census metropolitan area (CMA) or a census agglomeration (CA) is formed by one or more adjacent municipalities centred on a population centre (known as the core). A CMA must have a total population of at least 100,000 of which 50,000 or more must live in the core, based on adjusted data from the previous census. A CA must have a core population of at least 10,000, also based on data from the previous census. To be included in the CMA or CA, other adjacent municipalities must have a high degree of integration with the core, as measured by commuting flows derived from data on place of work from the previous census.

If the population of the core of a CA falls below 10,000, the CA is retired from the next census. However, once an area becomes a CMA, it is retained as a CMA even if its total population falls below 100,000 or the population of its core falls below 50,000. All areas inside the CMA or CA that are not population centres are rural areas.

When a CA has a core of at least 50,000, based on the previous Census of Population, it is subdivided into census tracts. Census tracts are maintained for the CA even if the population of the core subsequently falls below 50,000. All CMAs are subdivided into census tracts.

Census metropolitan category

The census metropolitan categories are groupings of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and census metropolitan influenced zones outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations established for the purpose of statistical reporting. There are three census metropolitan categories:

A. Census metropolitan areas (CMAs)
B. Census agglomerations (CAs)
C. Outside census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and census agglomerations (CAs)

Census metropolitan influenced zone

The census metropolitan influenced zone (MIZ) is a concept that geographically differentiates the area of Canada outside census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and census agglomerations (CAs). Census subdivisions (CSDs) within provinces that are outside CMAs and CAs are assigned to one of four categories according to the degree of influence (strong, moderate, weak or no influence) that the CMAs or CAs have on them. CSDs within the territories that are outside CAs are assigned to a separate category.

A municipality within a province is assigned to a census metropolitan influenced zone (MIZ) category based on the percentage of its employed labour force that commutes to work in one or more of the municipalities (census subdivisions) that are part of the delineation core of a CMA or CA. The calculation of the employed labour force excludes the category of no fixed workplace address. CSDs with the same degree of influence tend to be clustered. They form zones around CMAs and CAs that progress through the categories from 'strong' to 'no' influence as distance from the CMAs and CAs increases. As many CSDs in the territories are very large and sparsely populated, the commuting flow of the resident employed labour force is unstable. For this reason, CSDs in the territories that are outside CAs are assigned to a separate category that is not based on their commuting flows.

CSDs outside CMAs and CAs are assigned to the following MIZ categories:
1. Strong metropolitan influenced zone: This category includes CSDs in provinces where at least 30% of the CSD's resident employed labour force (excluding the category of no fixed workplace address) commutes to work in any CMA or CA. It excludes CSDs from the previous census with fewer than 40 persons in their resident employed labour force.
2. Moderate metropolitan influenced zone: This category includes CSDs in provinces where at least 5% but less than 30% of the CSD's resident employed labour force (excluding the category of no fixed workplace address) commute to work in any CMA or CA. It excludes CSDs from the previous census with fewer than 40 persons in their resident employed labour force.
3. Weak metropolitan influenced zone: This category includes CSDs in provinces where more than 0% but less than 5% of the CSD's resident employed labour force (excluding the category of no fixed workplace address) commute to work in any CMA or CA. It excludes CSDs from the previous census with fewer than 40 persons in their resident employed labour force.
4. No metropolitan influenced zone: This category includes CSDs in provinces where none of the CSD's resident employed labour force (excluding the category of no fixed workplace address) commute to work in any CMA or CA. It also includes CSDs from the previous census with fewer than 40 persons in their resident employed labour force.
5. Territories (outside CAs): This category includes CSDs in the territories outside CAs.

Census subdivision

Census subdivision (CSD) is the general term for municipalities (as determined by provincial/territorial legislation) or areas treated as municipal equivalents for statistical purposes (e.g., Indian reserves, Indian settlements and unorganized territories).

Economic region

An economic region (ER) is a grouping of complete census divisions (with one exception in Ontario) created as a standard geographic unit for analysis of regional economic activity.

Geographical region of Canada

The geographical regions of Canada are groupings of provinces and territories established for the purpose of statistical reporting. The six geographical regions of Canada are:

1. Atlantic
2. Quebec
3. Ontario
4. Prairies
5. British Columbia
6. Territories

Place name

'Place name' (PN) refers to selected names of active and retired geographic areas as well as names from the Canadian Geographical Names Data Base. Place names also include names of census subdivisions (municipalities), census divisions, designated places, population centres, federal electoral districts, economic regions and census metropolitan areas, as well as the names of some local places.

Province or territory

'Province' and 'territory' refer to the major political units of Canada. From a statistical point of view, province and territory are basic areas for which data are tabulated. Canada is divided into 10 provinces and 3 territories.

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