2016 Census of Population Long-form Guide

About this guide

This guide contains instructions and examples to help you complete your 2016 Census long-form paper questionnaire as accurately as possible. Also included are reasons why the questions are asked and how the information you provide is used.


What is the census?

The census provides a statistical portrait of the country and its people. In Canada, it is mandatory for all residents to participate in the census.

Statistics Canada has reinstated the mandatory long-form census in time for the 2016 Census of Population.

To expedite this change, Statistics Canada is providing respondents with the paper questionnaire originally designed for the National Household Survey (NHS), as the 2016 Census long-form questionnaire.

The long-form census will collect information on the demographic, social and economic situation of people across Canada, and the dwellings they live in.

In 2016, a sample of 25% of Canadian households will receive a long-form questionnaire. The other households will receive a short-form questionnaire.


Why is the Census of Population Program important?

Information from the census will be used by governments, businesses, associations, community organizations and many others to make important decisions for your community, your province or territory, and the entire country.


If you need help

For general questions regarding the census, visit www.census.gc.ca.

Starting May 2, 2016, you can call the Census Help Line at 1-855-700-2016, Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., or Saturday and Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. if:

  • you need help completing your questionnaire or want information about the census
  • you need a new secure access code to complete your questionnaire online
  • you need more than one questionnaire because there are more people in your household than there is space for on the questionnaire
  • you need a new questionnaire because the original is lost or damaged
  • you want a copy of the questionnaire in French
  • you want a copy of the questions in a language other than English or French
  • someone in your household would prefer to complete a separate questionnaire.

To assist respondents whose first language is neither English nor French, the long-form census questions have been translated into 22 other languages, including 11 Aboriginal languages. Starting May 2, 2016, respondents can call the Census Help Line at 1-855-700-2016 to obtain a copy of the census questions in any of these 22 languages, or to obtain the long-form census questions in large print, braille or audio format.

For TTY (a telecommunications device for people who are deaf) service, call 1-866-753-7083.


The law protects what you tell us

By law, Statistics Canada must protect the confidentiality of the personal information you provide on your census questionnaire. All Statistics Canada employees could face fines or imprisonment if they contravene the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act.

Census results are only released in formats that do not identify individuals (e.g., aggregate data tables, graphs, analyses, etc.). No information that could identify you or a member of your household is ever released. The one exception is if you agree to question 10 and/or step G1, your personal census information will be provided to Library and Archives Canada after 92 years. For more information, please refer to question 10 and step G.


Does Statistics Canada use census information to conduct other surveys?

From time to time, Statistics Canada may use the census results to select households or individuals to participate in other important surveys. This is done only after it can be demonstrated that the census is the most cost-efficient and effective means to select the required sample. These uses are strictly for statistical purposes and no one outside of Statistics Canada can have access to any identifiable information.


To complete your long-form census questionnaire online

Visit the census website at www.census.gc.ca.

Enter the secure access code located on the front page of the printed long-form questionnaire.

When you click the Start questionnaire button on the census website, a test will be done automatically to verify that your computer and browser meet the minimum requirements. If they are not met, you will be provided with instructions on how to upgrade or modify your browser.


What happens to the information you provide?

The information you provide will be kept confidential, in accordance with the Statistics Act. Your information may be used by Statistics Canada in support of our other surveys or for analysis. No one outside of Statistics Canada can have access to information that identifies individuals.


Your role

The information you provide will help ensure that the 2016 Census accurately reflects Canada’s changing society. Your responses will ensure that your community has the information it needs for planning services such as child care, schooling, family services, housing, and skills training for employment.

The information you provide throughout the questionnaire should reflect each person’s situation on May 10, 2016, unless the questions specify otherwise. This reference date ensures that the information collected in the questionnaire provides an accurate snapshot of Canada’s society at this point in time in our history.


Starting off – step by step


Step A

Step A1: What is your telephone number?

Enter your telephone number, including area code, in the spaces provided.

We need your telephone number to contact you in case there is information missing on your questionnaire.

Step A2: What email address could we use to contact your household, if applicable?

Enter an email address we could use to contact your household.

If you do not have an email address, continue with the next question.

An email address provides an alternative method of communication with your household.

Step A3: What is the address of this dwelling?

Complete your address only if no printed address is provided on the cover page of the questionnaire or if the address where you lived on May 10, 2016, was different than the one printed on the front cover page.

If your address contains information for mail delivery such as a Post Office Box (PO Box), Rural Route, General Delivery or Lot and Concession, please enter this type of address in step A4.

We need your address to ensure that all dwellings are counted.

Step A4: What is the mailing address of this dwelling, if different from above?

Enter a mailing address only if you have one that is different from your civic or physical address reported in step A3. Include all parts of the mailing address that are different from the address in step A3.

A mailing address is an address used by Canada Post Corporation to deliver mail. Some Canadian households have a mailing address that is different from their civic or physical address. Examples of these types of addresses are Post Office Boxes (PO Boxes), Rural Routes and General Delivery. Some addresses also include supplementary information for mail delivery, such as Lot and Concession.

A mailing address provides a method of communication by mail with the respondent.


Step B

The questions in step B help you decide who should be included and who should not be included on your questionnaire. They help us ensure that we have counted everyone we need to count, and that no one is counted twice.

Step B1: Including yourself, how many persons usually live at this address on May 10, 2016?

Include:

  • all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away on May 10, 2016
  • Canadian citizens
  • landed immigrants (permanent residents)
  • persons from another country who have a work or study permit and family members living here with them
  • persons asking for refugee status (refugee claimants)and family members living here with them
  • sons and daughters who live elsewhere while studying but return to live at this address during the year (for example, on weekends, during semester breaks, or after their studies are completed)
  • children in joint custody who live here most of the time (more than 50% of the time). Children who spend equal time with each parent should be included at the address where they stayed on the night ofthe night of May 9 to May 10, 2016
  • spouses or common-law partners temporarily away who stay elsewhere while working or studying, should be listed at the main residence of their family, if they return periodically.
  • persons who have been in an institution (for example, in a home for the aged, a hospital, a prison, a rehabilitation centre, etc.) for less than six months (admitted after November 10, 2015)
  • babies born before May 10, 2016
  • persons deceased on or after May 10, 2016
  • persons who stayed overnight at this address between May 9 and May 10, 2016, and have no usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada
  • any other person who stayed overnight at this address between May 9 and May 10, 2016, including room-mates, lodgers, employees, etc. and have no usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

Exclude:

  • babies born on or after May 10, 2016
  • persons deceased before May 10, 2016
  • persons who moved out before May 10, 2016 (they must complete a questionnaire at their new address)
  • persons who have been in an institution (for example, in a home for the aged, a hospital, a prison, a rehabilitation centre, etc.) for six months or more (admitted on or before November 10, 2015).

Note:
The following persons must not be enumerated in the census, but they should nevertheless complete steps A and B of their questionnaire:

  • residents of another country who are visiting, on vacation or on a business trip in Canada
  • government representatives of another country who are assigned to an embassy, a consulate, a high commission, or any other diplomatic or military mission, as well as family members living here with them.

Step B2: Including yourself, list all persons who usually live here on May 10, 2016.

Important: Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children. Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address.

It is important to enter the family name(s) and given name(s) of all members of your household, to ensure that each person is enumerated.

If two people have the same names (family name and given name), make sure to distinguish between these two persons by adding the middle name (if applicable) or another identifier, such as “father” or “son”.


Step C

The questions in step C help you identify who should be included and who should not be included on your questionnaire. They help us ensure that we have counted everyone we need to count and that no one is counted twice.

Step C: Did you leave anyone out of step B because you were not sure the person should be listed?

Mark “No” if, in the previous step (step B), you listed all persons who have their main residence at this address on May 10, 2016.

If you are unsure of whether someone not already listed should be included, mark "Yes" and enter their name, their relationship with you and the reason why you are unsure whether to include them in the box provided.

Do not include anyone you have already listed in step B.

Make sure that each person is listed only once on this questionnaire.


Step D

The questions in step D tell us if someone in your household operates a farm. They also ensure that we count all farms for the Census of Agriculture.

Step D1: Is anyone listed in step B a farm operator who produces at least one agricultural product intended for sale?

If anyone listed in step B is a farm operator who produces at least one agricultural product intended for sale, mark “Yes”.

If none of the people listed in step B is a farm operator, mark “No” and go to step E.

Step D2: Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm?

Mark “Yes” or “No” to indicate whether the farm operator listed in step B makes the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm.


Step E

Copy the names in step B to question 1, on the top of page 4 of the questionnaire. Keep the same order.

If more than five persons live here, you will need an extra questionnaire; call 1-855-700-2016.


The Census questions


Basic population information (Questions 1 to 6)

Question 1 asks that you copy the name of each person in the household in the same order as provided in step B; and to answer the questions for each person listed. This ensures that we have counted everyone we need to count, and that no one is counted twice.

Questions 2 to 6 provide information about the living arrangements of people in Canada, the family size, the number of children living with one parent or two parents, and the number of people who live alone. This information is used for planning social programs, such as Old Age Security and the Canada child tax benefit. It is also used by communities to plan a variety of services such as daycare centres, schools, police, fire protection and residences for senior citizens.

Question 1 – Name

Copy the names listed in step B to question 1 at the top of page 4. The names must be written in the same order as they are in step B, using capital letters.

The following questions refer to each person’s situation on May 10, 2016, unless otherwise specified.

Question 2 – What is this person’s sex?

Mark either “Male” or “Female” to indicate the sex of each person.

Question 3 – What are this person’s date of birth and age?

In each of the fields provided, write in the day, month and year of birth and the age for each person.

If the exact date is not known, enter a best estimate. For children under the age of 1, enter 0.

Question 4 – What is this person’s marital status?

Mark the response that indicates the person’s current legal marital status. Legal marital status does not take into account the person’s common-law status. Common-law status is asked in question 5.

Question 5 – Is this person living with a common-law partner?

Mark “Yes” or “No” to indicate whether this person is living with a common-law partner.

Question 6 – What is the relationship of this person to Person 1?

Mark the response that indicates the person's relationship to the reference person (Person 1).

If none of the responses in the list applies, then specify a response under "Other relationship - specify". For example:

  • brother-in-law or sister-in-law
  • nephew or niece
  • grandfather or grandmother
  • room-mate's son or daughter
  • lodger's husband or wife
  • employee
  • etc.

Adopted children should be considered sons and daughters.


Language (Questions 7 to 9)

Questions 7 to 9 are used to provide a profile of the linguistic diversity of Canada’s population. This information is used to estimate the need for services in English and French, and to better understand the current status and the evolution of Canada’s various language groups.

Question 7 – Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation?

Mark “English only” or “French only”, or “Both English and French”, only if the person can carry on a conversation of some length on various topics in one or both of these languages.

For people who are deaf or for people who have a speech disability, report knowledge of English, French, both, or neither, by marking the appropriate option.

Question 8 a) What language does this person speak most often at home?

Report the language spoken most often at home. Report more than one language only if all languages are spoken equally often.

For a child who has not yet learned to speak, report the language spoken most often to the child at home.

For a person who lives alone, report the language in which he or she feels most comfortable.

For people who are deaf or for people who have a speech disability, report knowledge of English or French as applicable, by marking the appropriate option. Other languages, including sign language, should be entered in the box labeled “Other language - specify”.

When reporting other languages, be specific. For example, people who report Chinese should instead report the specific Chinese language: Cantonese, Mandarin, Cheochow, Fukien, Hakka, Shanghainese, Taiwanese, etc.

Question 8 b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home?

Report any other language(s) that the person speaks at home on a regular basis, but not as often as the main language(s) reported in question 8 a).

For people who are deaf or for people who have a speech disability, report knowledge of English or French as applicable, by marking the appropriate option. Other languages, including sign language, should be entered in the box labeled “Yes, other language - specify”.

When reporting other languages, be specific. For example, people who report Chinese should instead report the specific Chinese language: Cantonese, Mandarin, Cheochow, Fukien, Hakka, Shanghainese, Taiwanese, etc.

Question 9 – What is the language that this person first learned at home in childhood and still understands?

For a person who learned two or more languages at the same time in early childhood, report the language this person spoke most often at home before starting school.

Report two or more languages only if those languages were used equally often and are still understood by this person.

For a child who has not yet learned to speak, report the language spoken most often to this child at home.

For people who are deaf or for people who have a speech disability, report knowledge of English or French as applicable, by marking the appropriate option. Other languages, including sign language, should be entered in the box labeled “Other language - specify”.

When reporting other languages, be specific. For example, people who report Chinese should instead report the specific Chinese language: Cantonese, Mandarin, Cheochow, Fukien, Hakka, Shanghainese, Taiwanese, etc.


Access to personal Census information 92 years after the Census (Question 10)

Question 10 provides each person with the opportunity to make an informed decision about what happens to his or her personal short-form information in 92 years. Consenting to the release of this information in 92 years will help future generations better understand the Canada of today, and will benefit historical, academic and genealogical research.

This question is for all persons listed on the questionnaire. If you are answering on behalf of other people, please consult each person.

Note: question 10 applies to the paper questionnaire only, as this question does not appear in the electronic version of the long-form questionnaire.

Question 10 – Does this person agree to make his or her 2016 Census information available in 2108 (92 years after the census)?

This question is for all persons listed on the questionnaire.

If you are answering on behalf of other people, please consult each person. If a person’s view is not known, leave this question blank for that person.

For a child, only answer this question if agreement is given by his or her parent or legal guardian. If not known, leave this question blank for that person.

For a person legally unable to make a choice, a legal guardian can answer on his or her behalf. If not known, leave this question blank for that person.


Activities of daily living (Question 11)

Question 11 provides information on the number of people in Canada who have difficulties with their daily activities, and whose activities are reduced because of a long-term physical, mental or other health condition. This information is used to identify people who are likely to have a disability. Statistics Canada may then follow up with a more detailed survey.

Question 11 a) Does this person have any difficulty seeing (even when wearing glasses or contact lenses)?

If you use glasses or contact lenses, please answer this question based on your ability to see when using these aids.

Only difficulties or long-term conditions that have lasted or are expected to last for six months or more should be considered.

Question 11 b) Does this person have any difficulty hearing (even when using a hearing aid)?

If you use a hearing aid or a cochlear implant, please answer this question based on your ability to hear when using these aids.

Only difficulties or long-term conditions that have lasted or are expected to last for six months or more should be considered.

Question 11 c) Does this person have any difficulty walking, using stairs, using his/her hands or fingers or doing other physical activities?

Only difficulties or long-term conditions that have lasted or are expected to last for six months or more should be considered.

Question 11 d) Does this person have any difficulty learning, remembering or concentrating?

Only difficulties or long-term conditions that have lasted or are expected to last for six months or more should be considered.

Question 11 e) Does this person have any emotional, psychological or mental health conditions (e.g., anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, substance abuse, anorexia, etc.)?

Only difficulties or long-term conditions that have lasted or are expected to last for six months or more should be considered.

Question 11 f) Does this person have any other health problem or long-term condition that has lasted or is expected to last for six months or more?

Exclude: any health problems previously reported in questions 11 a) to 11 e).


Sociocultural information (Questions 12 to 21)

Question 12 provides information on the diversity of Canada’s population, and tells us about movements of people within Canada and from other countries to Canada.

Question 13 provides the citizenship status of Canada’s population. The information is used to plan citizenship classes and programs.

Questions 14 and 15 provide information about immigrants and non-permanent residents in Canada, and the year people immigrated. This information is used to compare the situation of immigrants over time, to evaluate immigration and employment policies and programs, and to plan education, health and other services.

Question 16 is used to provide a profile of the linguistic diversity of Canada’s population. This information is used to better understand the current status and the evolution of Canada’s various language groups.

Question 17 provides information about ethnic and cultural diversity in Canada. This information is used by associations, agencies and researchers for activities such as health promotion, communications and marketing.

Questions 18, 20 and 21 provide information used by governments, including Aboriginal governments and organizations, to develop programs and services for Aboriginal peoples.

Question 19 tells us about the visible minority population in Canada. This information is required for programs under the Employment Equity Act, which promote equal opportunity for everyone.

Question 12 – Where was this person born?

For persons who were born in Canada, please mark the province or territory of birth.

For persons who were born outside Canada, please report the country of birth according to present boundaries. For example, persons born in the former U.S.S.R. should report the specific country or republic that is now a nation state - Ukraine, Latvia, Russia, etc.

For persons who are not sure of the country because its boundaries have changed since the time of birth, please report the name of the nearest city, state or province.

For adopted persons, if place of birth is unknown, please report the place of birth of their adoptive parents.

Question 13 – Of what country is this person a citizen?

For persons born in Canada, unless - at the time of their birth - one or both parents were government representatives of another country (for example, in diplomatic service) and neither parent was a Canadian citizen or a landed immigrant:

  • mark “Canada, by birth”.

For persons born outside Canada, if at the time of their birth, one or both parents were Canadian citizens:

  • mark “Canada, by birth”.

For persons who have applied for, and have been granted, Canadian citizenship (i.e., persons who have been issued a Canadian citizenship certificate):

  • mark “Canada, by naturalization”.

For persons who were born outside Canada and have not become Canadian citizens:

  • report under “Other country - specify” the name of the other country for which they hold citizenship.

For persons who are dual citizens of Canada and another country, do not report “dual citizenship”:

  • mark either “Canada, by birth” or “Canada, by naturalization”, and report the name of the other country.

Question 14 – Is this person now, or has this person ever been, a landed immigrant?

For persons who are Canadian citizens by birth, foreign students, foreign workers, or refugee claimants:

  • mark “No”.

For persons who are Canadian citizens by naturalization or are permanent residents under the Immigration Act (permanent residents have been granted the right to live permanently in Canada by Canadian immigration authorities but have not yet obtained Canadian citizenship):

  • mark “Yes”.

Question 15 – In what year did this person first become a landed immigrant?

For persons who obtained their landed immigrant (permanent resident) status while living in Canada:

  • report the year landed immigrant (permanent resident) status was obtained.

For persons who immigrated to Canada more than once:

  • report the year when landed immigrant status was first obtained.

Question 16 – What language(s), other than English or French, can this person speak well enough to conduct a conversation?

Report only those languages in which the person can carry on a conversation of some length on various topics.

For people who are deaf or for people who have a speech disability, report knowledge of other languages, including sign language.

When reporting other languages, be specific. For example, people who report Chinese should instead report the specific Chinese language: Cantonese, Mandarin, Cheochow, Fukien, Hakka, Shanghainese, Taiwanese, etc.

Question 17 – What were the ethnic or cultural origins of this person’s ancestors?

This question refers to the ethnic or cultural origin or origins of a person’s ancestors. Other than Aboriginal persons, most people can trace their origins to their ancestors who first came to this continent. Ancestry should not be confused with citizenship or nationality.

For all persons, report the specific ethnic or cultural group or groups to which their ancestors belonged, not the language they spoke.

For persons of East Indian or South Asian origins, report a specific origin or origins. Do not report “Indian”. For example, report “East Indian from India”, “East Indian from Guyana”, or indicate the specific group, such as “Punjabi” or “Tamil”.

For persons with Aboriginal ancestors, report a specific origin or origins. For example, report “Cree”, “Mi’kmaq”, “Ojibway”, “Métis”, or “North American Indian”. Do not report “Indian”.

Question 18 – Is this person an Aboriginal person, that is, First Nations (North American Indian), Métis or Inuk (Inuit)?

Answer this question regardless of whether or not this person is an Aboriginal person of North America.

Mark “Yes, First Nations (North American Indian)”, or “Yes, Métis”, or “Yes, Inuk (Inuit)” for persons who meet the following two conditions:

  • they have ancestors who resided in North America prior to European contact
  • they identify with one of the three Aboriginal groups listed on the questionnaire: First Nations (North American Indian), Métis, or Inuit.

Mark “No, not an Aboriginal person” for those who:

  • consider themselves to be East Indian or Asian Indian
  • have ethnic roots on the subcontinent of India
  • refer to themselves as Métis in the context of mixed ancestry, but who do not have North American Aboriginal ancestry - for example, those from Africa, the Caribbean and South America.

Question 19 – Population group

Mark or specify more than one answer, if applicable, from the list provided.

Population group should not be confused with citizenship or nationality. Examples of population groups include White, South Asian, Chinese, Black, Filipino, Latin American, Arab, Southeast Asian, West Asian, Korean and Japanese.

Included in the South Asian population group are East Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, etc.

Included in the Southeast Asian population group are Vietnamese, Cambodian, Laotian, Thai, etc.

Included in the West Asian population group are Iranian, Afghan, etc.

For persons who belong to more than one population group:

  • mark all categories that apply
  • do not report “bi-racial” or “mixed” in the “Other - specify” box provided.

Question 20 – Is this person a Status Indian (Registered or Treaty Indian as defined by the Indian Act of Canada)?

Mark “Yes, Status Indian (Registered or Treaty)” for persons who:

  • are Registered Indians under the Indian Act
  • are Treaty Indians, only if they are Registered Indians under the Indian Act
  • have become registered since June 1985, when Bill C-31 changed the Indian Act.

All other persons should mark “No”, including persons who may be entitled to register under provisions of the Indian Act, but for some reason have not.

Question 21 – Is this person a member of a First Nation/Indian band?

A First Nation/Indian band is a group of people for whom lands have been set apart and/or money is held by the Crown.

A member of a First Nation/Indian band is an individual who is recognized as being a member of a First Nation/Indian band, as defined by either the band itself or the Indian Act.

Individuals should report their First Nation/Indian band affiliation rather than their tribal affiliation - for example, “Chemawawin Cree Nation” instead of “Cree”.


Mobility (Questions 22 and 23)

Questions 22 and 23 tell us where residents of Canada are moving to and where they are moving from. This information is used to look at the characteristics of people who move, and to help identify the needs for housing, education, transportation and social services.

Question 22 – Where did this person live 1 year ago, that is, on May 10, 2015?

Mark “Lived at the same address as now”:

  • if the address has not changed since May 10, 2015
  • if the address has changed due to a boundary change or a name change of the municipality, Indian reserve or township.

Mark “Lived at a different address in the same city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve”:

  • if the person lived at a different address in the same city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve on May 10, 2015.

Mark “Lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve in Canada”:

  • if the person lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve in Canada on May 10, 2015.

Enter the name of the city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, the name of the province or territory, and the postal code.

Note: Enter the name of the city or town, rather than the metropolitan area of which it is a part.

Mark “Lived outside Canada”:

  • if the person lived outside Canada on May 10, 2015.

Enter the name of the country according to its current boundaries.

Question 23 – Where did this person live 5 years ago, that is, on May 10, 2011?

Mark “Lived at the same address as now”:

  • if the address has not changed since May 10, 2011
  • if the address has changed due to a boundary change or a name change of the municipality, Indian reserve or township.

Mark “Lived at a different address in the same city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve”:

  • if the person lived at a different address in the same city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve on May 10, 2011.

Mark “Lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve in Canada”:

  • if the person lived in a different city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve in Canada on May 10, 2011.

Enter the name of the city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, the name of the province or territory, and the postal code.

Note: Enter the name of the city or town, rather than the metropolitan area of which it is a part.

Mark “Lived outside Canada”:

  • if the person lived outside Canada on May 10, 2011.

Enter the name of the country according to its current boundaries.


Place of birth of parents (Question 24)

Question 24 is used to assess the social and economic conditions of second-generation Canadians, and helps us understand Canada’s immigration history.

Question 24 – Where was each of this person’s parents born?

For parents who were born in Canada, please mark “Born in Canada”.

For parents who were born outside Canada, please report the country of birth according to present boundaries. For example, for parents born in the former U.S.S.R., please report the specific country or republic that is now a nation state―Ukraine, Latvia, Russia, etc.

For persons who are not sure of the country because its boundaries have changed since the time of their parents’ birth, please report the name of the nearest city, state or province.

For adopted persons, if place of birth of parents is unknown, please report the place of birth of their adoptive parents.

For persons of same-sex parents, please report the place of birth of one parent in question 24 a) and that of the other parent in question 24 b).


Answer questions 25 to 49 for each person aged 15 years and over (born before May 10, 2001).

Education (Questions 25 to 29)

Questions 25 to 29 provide information on the education, training and recent school attendance of residents of Canada. Governments use this information to develop training and other programs to meet the changing needs of our workforce and of specific groups such as immigrants, Aboriginal peoples, and youth.

Question 25 – Has this person completed a high school (secondary school) diploma or equivalent?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Mark “Yes, high school diploma”:

  • if this person graduated from high school, even if the person graduated from a high school outside of Canada.

Mark “Yes, high school equivalency certificate”:

  • if this person has a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or Adult Basic Education (ABE) certificate
  • if this person has enough credits for the equivalent of high school graduation in the province or territory in which he or she now lives, even if that person obtained his or her education outside of Canada.

Exclude:

  • DEP/DVS (diplôme d’études professionnelles/diploma of vocational studies) from Quebec. This diploma should be reported in question 26 a) in the “Yes, other trades certificate or diploma” category, even if the person received this diploma from a high school.

Question 26 a) – Has this person completed a Registered Apprenticeship or other trades certificate or diploma?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Include:

  • trades certificates and diplomas, even if they were obtained from a college, CEGEP, or other non-university institution. These trades certificates or diplomas should not be reported again in question 26 b)
  • DEP/DVS (diplôme d’études professionnelles/diploma of vocational studies) from Quebec. Persons with this diploma should report it in question 26 a) in the “Yes, other trades certificate or diploma” category, even if they received this diploma from a high school
  • certificates, diplomas or degrees obtained outside of Canada: report these in the category equivalent to that of the system of the province or territory in which the person currently lives.

Exclude:

  • training certificates from an employer, unless they are apprenticeship or trades certificates recognized by the federal, provincial or territorial government.

Certificate of Qualification/Journeyperson’s designation

  • A certified Journeyperson is a person who has received a “Certificate of Qualification” from a regulatory authority such as a provincial or territorial government, has successfully completed an examination and has met a standard of achievement with respect to a trade such as carpenter or electrician. A Journeyperson can train and mentor a registered apprentice.
  • Mark “Yes, Certificate of Apprenticeship or Certificate of Qualification (Journeyperson’s designation)”:
  • if the person received a certificate from a certified registered apprenticeship program
  • if the person received a Certificate of Qualification (for example, Journeyperson’s designation, Red Seal endorsement) with respect to a trade, regardless of whether or not he or she completed a registered apprenticeship program.
  • Mark “Yes, other trades certificate or diploma”:
  • if the person received a certificate or diploma through in-school training in trade-level vocational or pre-vocational programs given at community colleges, institutes of technology, and similar institutions
  • if the person received a DEP/DVS (diplôme d’études professionnelles/diploma of vocational studies) from Quebec. Persons with this diploma should report it in this category, even if they received this diploma from a secondary high school.

Question 26 b) – Has this person completed a college , CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Include:

  • only completed college, CEGEP, or other non-university qualifications obtained from educational institutions accredited by a province, territory or their international equivalents
  • certificates or diplomas from a community college (both university transfer and semi-professional career programs)
  • certificates or diplomas from a CEGEP (both general and technical)
  • In Quebec, diplomas for the general CEGEP program should be reported under the category “Yes, certificate or diploma from a program of 1 year to 2 years.”
  • In Quebec, diplomas for the technical CEGEP program should be reported under the category “Yes, certificate or diploma from a program of more than 2 years.”
  • certificates or diplomas from an institute of technology, police college or any other post-secondary institution other than a trade school or a university
  • college or other non-university qualifications obtained outside of Canada: report these in the category equivalent to that of the system of the province or territory in which the person currently lives.

Exclude:

  • trades certificates or diplomas, even if they were obtained from a college, CEGEP, or other non-university institution. Report this type of qualification in question 26 a)
  • the in-class portion of a registered apprenticeship program
  • training certificates from an employer, unless they correspond to courses offered by a recognized educational institution.

Program length

  • Mark the regular program length for any college, CEGEP, or other non-university certificates or diplomas completed, and not the time it actually took to complete the program.
  • For persons who received their certificate or diploma from correspondence courses, online courses, or through part-time classes, mark the regular length of the program, and not the time it actually took to complete the program.

University degrees granted from a college

For persons who received:

  • a university certificate, diploma or degree from a university college:
    • mark the appropriate university category in question 26 c).
  • a bachelor’s degree or an applied degree from a degree-granting college:
    • mark “Yes, bachelor’s degree (e.g., B.A., B.A.(Hons.), B.Sc., B.Ed., LL.B.)” in question 26 c).

Teacher qualifications

  • For persons with a teaching certificate from a non-university teacher’s college:
    • include all college or other postsecondary certificates from institutions other than universities, whether or not a high school diploma was required for entrance.
  • For persons with a teaching certificate from a university faculty of education or an institution that was associated with an accredited university:
    • report this in question 26 c), as a university certificate, diploma or degree (see instructions for “Teacher qualifications” in question 26 c)).

Question 26 c) – Has this person completed a university certificate, diploma or degree?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Include:

  • all university certificates, diplomas or degrees that a person completed
  • university qualifications granted by university colleges and bachelor’s degrees, or applied degrees from degree-granting colleges
  • only university qualifications obtained from educational institutions accredited by a province, territory or their international equivalents
  • university qualifications obtained outside of Canada. Report these in the category equivalent to that of the system of the province or territory in which the person now lives.

University certificates or diplomas, either below or abovethe bachelor level

  • University certificates or diplomas, either below or above the bachelor level, are awarded for non-degree programs of study completed through a university. They are often connected with professional associations in fields such as accounting, banking, insurance or public administration.

Include:

  • only completed certificates or diplomas.

Exclude:

  • degrees in progress or incomplete degrees
  • bachelor’s degrees or applied degrees from degree-granting colleges. Report these qualifications in “Yes, bachelor’s degree (e.g., B.A., B.A.(Hons.), B.Sc., B.Ed., LL.B.)”
  • bachelor’s degrees granted outside of Canada. Report these qualifications in “Yes, bachelor’s degree (e.g., B.A., B.A.(Hons.), B.Sc., B.Ed., LL.B.)”
  • university transfer programs or non-university professional designations

Mark “Yes, university certificate or diploma below bachelor level”if a bachelor’s degree is not required to enroll in the program.

Mark “Yes, university certificate or diploma above bachelor level” if a bachelor’s degree is required to enroll in the program.

Teacher qualifications

  • If the person earned his or her teaching qualifications at an accredited university’s faculty of education:
    • Mark “Yes, bachelor’s degree (e.g., B.A., B.A.(Hons.), B.Sc., B.Ed., LL.B.)”.
  • If the person has a non-degree teaching certificate awarded by a provincial or territorial department of education for a program at an approved institution associated with a university, and where a bachelor’s degree was not required to enroll in the program:
    • Mark “Yes, university certificate or diploma below bachelor level”.

Question 27) – What was the major field of study of the highest certificate, diploma or degree that this person completed?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

  • Report the field of study corresponding to the person’s highest certificate, diploma, or degree received, though it may not correspond to his or her current occupation.
  • Please be specific. Wherever possible, enter the sub-category of specialization within a broad area of training, especially for graduate studies or other advanced training.

How to determine highest certificate, diploma or degree

  • “Highest certificate, diploma or degree” completed is generally related to the amount of time spent in-class.
  • For persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma, or degree, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than the trades.
  • Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

More than one certificate, diploma or degree

  • Report the field of study corresponding to the person’s highest certificate, diploma, or degree received, though it may not correspond to his or her current occupation.
  • If the person earned more than one certificate, diploma or degree, at the same level (for example, two college certificates of equal length or two bachelor’s degrees):
    • enter the field of study for the certificate most recently obtained.

Specialized in more than one field of study

  • If the person specialized in more than one field of study while earning his or her highest certificate, diploma or degree:
  • enter the field in which the greatest number of credits or courses was obtained.

Question 28) – In what province, territory or country did this person complete his or her highest certificate, diploma or degree?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Report the location (province, territory or country) of the institution from which the person obtained his or her highest certificate, diploma or degree. Specify one location only, according to current geographic boundaries.

For persons who reported a location of study outside Canada, but who are not sure of their country of study because its boundaries have changed since the time of their studies:

  • enter the name of the nearest city, state or province.

For persons who completed their highest certificate, diploma or degree through correspondence, online learning or distance learning:

  • enter the location (province, territory or country) of the institution from which the certificate, diploma or degree was received.

Where two or more institutions jointly offer a program of study and are physically located in separate regions:

  • enter the location (province, territory or country) of the lead institution.

For persons who earned more than one certificate, diploma or degree at the same level (for example, two college certificates of equal length or two bachelor’s degrees):

  • enter the location (province, territory or country) for the certificate most recently obtained.

Question 29) – At any time since September 2015, has this person attended a school, college, CEGEP or university?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Mark “Yes” for the appropriate category or categories for all persons who attended a school or an educational institution at any time between the beginning of September 2015 and May 2016, full time or part time, even if they were registered but subsequently dropped out.

Only include school attendance where the courses can be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree from a recognized educational institution.

Educational institutions also include seminaries, schools of nursing, private business schools, private or public trade schools, vocational schools, or schools for people who are deaf or blind.

Include courses offered through correspondence, online learning or distance learning if the courses can be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree from a recognized educational institution. Also include attendance at the in-class portion of an apprenticeship program.

Do not include training received from an employer unless it corresponds to courses offered by a recognized educational institution.

If the person took courses at more than one institution, mark all categories that apply.

If the person is attending a degree-granting college in order to obtain a bachelor’s degree or an applied degree, mark “Yes, attended university”.


Labour market activities (Questions 30 to 49)

Questions 30 to 41 and 45 to 47 provide information on Canada’s workforce, including the industries and occupations in which people work, as well as the language(s) used at work. Employment information is used to assess the economic conditions of communities and specific populations, such as Aboriginal peoples and immigrants. Industry and occupation information is used to forecast job opportunities.

Questions 42 to 44 tell us where people work and how they get to work. This information is used to assess commuting patterns, public transit needs and energy use.

Commuting information also helps to identify locations for new hospitals, schools, daycare and recreational facilities, and the need for roads and transit services.

Questions 48 to 49 provide information on expenses related to child care and support payments. Along with the information on income obtained from personal income tax and benefit records, these questions help provide more precise measures of disposable income.

Question 30) – During the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2016, how many hours did this person spend working for pay or in self-employment?

For each person 15 years and over, enter the total number of hours worked for pay at all jobs and in self-employment during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016.

Include:

  • hours spent working for salary, wages, tips or commission
  • hours spent working in one’s own business, agricultural operation or professional practice, alone or with a partner
  • hours spent working directly towards the operation of a family agricultural operation, business or professional practice without pay. This means working for a spouse or another relative who is a member of the same household. Include any work that helped the relative run his or her agricultural operation or business. For example, include bookkeeping for a business owned by a spouse.

Include as hours worked:

  • all time spent maintaining and administering the operation of one’s own agricultural operation, business or professional practice
  • all time spent fishing, trapping or hunting for profit or to maintain the community, with equipment that is rented, owned or owned in part
  • for fishers, hours spent preparing and maintaining boats, nets, etc.
  • for farmers, hours spent maintaining farm fences, buildings or machinery, cultivating, sowing, milking, etc.

If the number of hours is not known, report the best estimate.

Retired persons

If this person is retired but has another job or business, answer for the current job or business this person has, even if he or she was absent from that current job or business during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016.

If this person is retired and did not have another job or business during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, answer “None” and continue on to answer questions 31 to 35 inclusively.

Question 31) – During the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, was this person on temporary lay-off or absent from his/her job or business?

Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016.

Mark “Yes, on temporary lay-off from a job to which this person expects to return” for persons who expect to return to the job from which they were laid off, no matter how long ago they were laid off.

Mark “Yes, on vacation, ill, on strike or locked out, or absent for other reasons” for persons who had a job or business during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016and were absent with or without pay for the whole week. This includes absences because of parental leave (maternity or paternity), bad weather, fire, personal or family responsibilities, etc.

If this person did not have a job, mark “No”.

Retired persons

If this person is retired but has another job or business, answer for the current job or business this person has. Mark the appropriate reasons why this person was absent from his or her current job.

All persons who did not work any hours during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016 (answered “None” to question 30) should answer questions 31 to 35 inclusively even if the reason they did not work was because they were retired.

Question 32) – During the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, did this person have definite arrangements to start a new job within the next four weeks?

Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016.

All persons who did not work any hours during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016 (answered “None” to question 30) should answer questions 31 to 35 inclusively even if the reason they did not work was because they were retired.

Question 33) – Did this person look for paid work during the four weeks from April 10 to May 7, 2016?

Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016.

All persons who did not work any hours during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016 (answered “None” to question 30) should answer questions 31 to 35 inclusively even if the reason they did not work was because they were retired.

Question 34) – Could this person have started a job during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2016, had one been available?

Answer only for persons aged 15 and over who did not work for pay during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016 and who actively looked for work in the previous four weeks.

All persons who did not work any hours during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016 (answered “None” to question 30) should answer questions 31 to 35 inclusively even if the reason they did not work was because they were retired.

Question 35) – When did this person last work for pay or in self-employment, even for a few days?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Include only:

  • work done for wages, salary, tips, commission, piece-rate payment, payment in kind (payment in goods and services rather than in money)
  • work done in self-employment
  • work done without pay by family members for family businesses, agricultural operations or professional practice.

Do not include:

  • volunteer work
  • unpaid housework
  • unpaid child care
  • unpaid care to seniors
  • unpaid home maintenance
  • leisure activities.

Retired persons

All persons who did not work any hours during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016 (answered “None” to question 30) should answer questions 31 to 35 inclusively even if the reason they did not work was because they were retired.

Question 36) – For whom did this person work?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

For self-employed persons, enter the name of the business. If the business does not have a name, enter the person’s name.

For persons aged 15 and over who work as employees in someone’s home (for example, nannies), enter the name of the family worked for, then enter “private household”.

For persons aged 15 and over whose wages are paid by an agency that hires out their services, enter the name of the agency.

If the person held more than one job, he or she should answer questions 36 to 45 for the job at which he or she worked the most hours.

Question 37) – What kind of business, industry or service was this?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Describe the type of business, industry or service in detail. For example, “automotive brake linings manufacturing” would be a more complete response than “auto parts”; and “road and highway construction” would be a more complete response than “construction”.

If the person held more than one job, he or she should answer questions 36 to 45 for the job at which he or she worked the most hours.

Question 38) – What was this person’s work or occupation?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Give specific descriptions of the occupation or work done. For example, “electrical equipment maintainer” would be a more complete response than “maintenance”; and “auto mechanic helper” would be a more complete response than “helper”.

If the person held more than one job, he or she should answer questions 36 to 45 for the job at which he or she worked the most hours.

Question 39) – In this work, what were this person’s main activities?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Report the main activities this person does in his or her job. Be sure to indicate supervisory or management responsibilities if they apply.

For persons who are members of a religious order engaged in teaching or nursing, enter these specific activities rather than the religious activities.

If the person held more than one job, he or she should answer questions 36 to 45 for the job at which he or she worked the most hours.


Question 40) – In this job or business, was this person mainly:

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Mark “working for wages, salary, tips or commission” for persons aged 15 and over who worked:

  • for wages or salary
  • for tips
  • on commission as a salesperson
  • for payment in kind (room, board) in a non-family enterprise (for example, as a member of a religious order)
  • for piece-rates
  • as a member of the Armed Forces
  • as a paid housekeeper or nanny.

Mark “working without pay for his/her spouse or another relative in a family farm or business” for persons aged 15 and over who worked without money wages at a task that contributed to the operation of an agricultural operation or business that belongs to a spouse or relative who is a member of this household.

“Self-employed” refers to persons aged 15 and over who:

  • operated their own business, agricultural operation or professional practice (alone or in partnership), even if no goods or services were sold
  • operated their own business, agricultural operation or professional practice (alone or in partnership), whether it made a profit or suffered a loss
  • operated an agricultural operation, whether they owned or rented the land
  • worked on a freelance or contract basis
  • provided meals and/or room or daycare services in their own home for boarders, roomers or neighbours’ children
  • operated a direct distributorship selling and delivering products such as cosmetics, newspapers, brushes or cleaning products
  • fished, trapped or hunted for profit, or for the maintenance of the community, with equipment that is rented, owned or owned in part
  • were setting up a business, agricultural operation or professional practice.

Mark “self-employed without paid help (alone or in partnership)” if the person is self-employed and does not have any employees.

Mark “self-employed with paid help (alone or in partnership)” if the person is self-employed and has one or more paid employee(s).

Retired persons

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2015 and May 10, 2016, should answer questions 36 to 47, even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, but who have worked since January 1, 2015, should answer questions 30 to 35 for the last job they held, even if it was in another country, and continue with questions 36 to 47.

General

If the person held more than one job, he or she should answer questions 36 to 45 for the job at which he or she worked the most hours.

Question 41) – If self-employed, was this person’s farm or business incorporated?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Incorporated business is a business or agricultural operation that has been formed into a legal corporation under either federal or provincial/territorial laws.

Mark “Yes” if the person is self-employed and his or her business is incorporated.

Mark “No” if the person is self-employed and his or her business is not incorporated.

Retired persons

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2015 and May 10, 2016, should answer questions 36 to 47, even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, but who have worked since January 1, 2015, should answer questions 30 to 35 for the last job they held, even if it was in another country, and continue with questions 36 to 47.

Question 42) – At what address did this person usually work most of the time?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

These questions should be completed for the job recorded in questions 36 to 41.

For persons who had more than one job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Report this person’s regular place of work, even if he or she was temporarily on assignment, training or holiday during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016.

If the person did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job of the longest duration in the past year and a half, that is, since January 1, 2015.

For persons aged 15 and over who worked most of the time at home - for example, farmers, apartment building superintendents, teleworkers, etc.

  • mark “Worked at home (including farms)”.

For persons who worked part of the time at home and part of the time at an employer’s address, but most of the time was spent working at home (for example, three days out of five, or 10 hours out of 15),

  • mark “Worked at home (including farms)”.

For persons who worked at various work locations or job sites and did not report to a headquarters or depot before starting work each day:

  • mark “No fixed workplace address”.

For employees who usually worked at a specific location other than their homes:

  • mark “Worked at the address specified below”.

For persons who worked part of the time at home and part of the time at an employer’s address, but spent most of their working time at an employer’s address,

  • mark “Worked at the address specified below”.

For persons who reported to a headquarters or depot each day, before going to various work locations or job sites:

  • mark “Worked at the address specified below”.

When “Worked at the address specified below” is marked, enter the address. Provide a complete address including street number, name, type and, if applicable, direction. Give the name of the city or town rather than the metropolitan area of which it is a part.

If the employer’s address is unknown, or if the employer’s mailing address is a Post Office box, enter the name of the building or the nearest street intersection of the employer’s physical address. Do not give a Post Office box number.

Retired persons

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2015 and May 10, 2016, should answer questions 36 to 47, even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, but who have worked since January 1, 2015, should answer questions 30 to 35 for the last job they held, even if it was in another country, and continue with questions 36 to 47.

Question 43 a) How did this person usually get to work?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Questions 42 to 44 should be completed for the job recorded in questions 36 to 41.

For persons who had more than one job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job at which they worked the most hours.

If the person did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job of the longest duration in the past year and a half, that is, since January 1, 2015.

Mark the type of transportation usually used to get to work.

Mark only one response indicating the type of transportation used for most of the distance travelled.

If different modes of transportation were used to go to work and come home:

  • mark the mode of transportation used to get to work.

If different modes of transportation were used at different times of the year, for example, the person took public transit to work during the winter and walked, bicycled, or used a motorcycle in the summer:

  • mark the mode of transportation used during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016.

If more than one mode of transportation was used, for example, driving and taking public transit:

  • the person should mark the one used for most of the travel distance.

If the person did not regularly commute from home to work, for example, his or her home was far away from his or her work, and the person lived near his or her work during the work week and traveled home on weekends:

  • the person should answer according to where he or she lived when at work.

Retired persons

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2015 and May 10, 2016, should answer questions 36 to 47, even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, but who have worked since January 1, 2015, should answer questions 30 to 35 for the last job they held, even if it was in another country, and continue with questions 36 to 47.

Question 43 b) How many people, including this person, usually shared the ride to work in this car, truck or van?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Questions 42 to 44 should be completed for the job recorded in questions 36 to 41.

For persons who had more than one job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job at which they worked the most hours.

If the person did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job of the longest duration in the past year and a half, that is, since January 1, 2015.

For those who marked “Car, truck or van - as a driver” or “Car, truck or van - as a passenger” in question 43 a):

  • mark the appropriate response to indicate how many people usually shared the ride to work.

For people who were driven to work by someone who was not going to work:

  • the question refers to the number of people who shared the ride to work. If no other people in the car, truck or van were traveling to work, the person should mark “Drove alone”.

Retired persons

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2015 and May 10, 2016, should answer questions 36 to 47, even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, but who have worked since January 1, 2015, should answer questions 30 to 35 for the last job they held, even if it was in another country, and continue with questions 36 to 47.

Question 44 a) What time did this person usually leave home to go to work?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Questions 42 to 44 should be completed for the job recorded in questions 36 to 41.

For persons who had more than one job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job at which they worked the most hours.

If the person did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job of the longest duration in the past year and a half, that is, since January 1, 2015.

Enter the time the person usually left his or her home in order to go to work according to the 12 hour clock - then mark either “a.m.” or “p.m.” as appropriate.

If the person left for work at noon, enter “12:00” and mark “p.m.”. If the person left for work at midnight, enter “12:00” and mark “a.m.”.

If the person’s work schedule varied, or if he or she worked different shifts:

  • report the time that the person left most often during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016. If there is no ‘most often’ time, then select a specific day that the person worked and report the time that he or she left on that day.

If the person did not travel directly from home to work, for example, a student who went from school to his or her work:

  • report the time that the person left school to go to work rather than the time that he or she left home.

Retired persons

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2015 and May 10, 2016, should answer questions 36 to 47, even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, but who have worked since January 1, 2015, should answer questions 30 to 35 for the last job they held, even if it was in another country, and continue with questions 36 to 47.

Question 44 b) How many minutes did it usually take this person to get from home to work?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Questions 42 to 44 should be completed for the job recorded in questions 36 to 41.

For persons who had more than one job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job at which they worked the most hours.

If the person did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, questions 42 to 44 should be answered for the job of the longest duration in the past year and a half, that is, since January 1, 2015.

Enter the number of minutes it usually took the person to get from home to work. The travel time is from door to door. Include the time waiting for public transit or picking up passengers. Do not include the time taken to get from work to home.

If the trip to work normally includes a stop such as dropping off children at daycare:

  • include the time traveling to this stop, but do not include the time at this stop.

Retired persons

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2015 and May 10, 2016, should answer questions 36 to 47, even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, but who have worked since January 1, 2015, should answer questions 30 to 35 for the last job they held, even if it was in another country, and continue with questions 36 to 47.

Question 45 a) In this job, what language did this person use most often?

Report two or more languages only if they are used equally often.

Report languages used to speak, read or write in order to perform a job or a major task.

Do not report a language used only during coffee, lunch or other rest breaks.

For people who are deaf or for people who have a speech disability, report as applicable the use of English or French (spoken, read or written) in order to perform a job or a major task, by marking the appropriate option. Other languages, including sign language, should be entered in the box labeled “Other language - specify”.

When reporting other languages, be specific. For example, people who report Chinese should instead report the specific Chinese language: Cantonese, Mandarin, Cheochow, Fukien, Hakka, Shanghainese, Taiwanese, etc.

If the person held more than one job, he or she should answer questions 36 to 45 for the job at which he or she worked the most hours.

Question 45 b) Did this person use any other languages on a regular basis in this job?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Report any other language(s) that this person may use on a regular basis in performing a job or a major task, though not as often as the main language(s) reported in question 45 a).

Do not report a language used only during coffee, lunch or other rest breaks.

For people who are deaf or for people who have a speech disability, report as applicable the use of English or French (spoken, read or written) in order to perform a job or a major task, by marking the appropriate option. Other languages, including sign language, should be entered in the box labeled “Yes, other language - specify” box.

When reporting other languages, be specific. For example, people who report Chinese should instead report the specific Chinese language: Cantonese, Mandarin, Cheochow, Fukien, Hakka, Shanghainese, Taiwanese, etc.

If the person held more than one job, he or she should answer questions 36 to 45 for the job at which he or she worked the most hours.

Question 46) – How many weeks did this person work in 2015?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Include any week in which persons aged 15 and over worked for pay or in self-employment in 2015, even if they only worked for a few hours during the entire week.

Exclude weeks on leave without pay.

Include weeks:

  • on leave with pay
  • on training paid for by the employer
  • on paid vacation and sick leave with pay.

Next to “Number of weeks”, enter “52” for persons who worked less than a year but who were paid on a 12-month basis, for example, teachers.

Self-employed persons

Next to “Number of weeks”, enter “52” for persons who operated an agricultural operation, business or professional practice for the full year, including weeks on vacation or sick leave (paid or unpaid).

Retired persons

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2015 and May 10, 2016, should answer questions 36 to 47, even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, but who have worked since January 1, 2015, should answer questions 30 to 35 for the last job they held, even if it was in another country, and continue with questions 36 to 47.

Question 47) – During most of those weeks, did this person work full time or part time?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

Mark “Full time (30 hours or more per week)” for persons aged 15 and over who worked 30 hours or more per week at all jobs (may be more than one), salaried or self-employed, during most of the weeks they had worked in 2015.

Mark “Part time (less than 30 hours per week)” for persons aged 15 and over who worked less than 30 hours per week at all jobs (may be more than one), salaried or self-employed, during most of the weeks they had worked in 2015.

Persons who had a part-time job during one part of the year and a full-time job during the other part of the year should answer on the basis of the job for which they worked the greatest number of weeks.

Retired persons

All persons who did any work for pay or in self-employment between January 1, 2015 and May 10, 2016, should answer questions 36 to 47, even if they are retired at the time of the survey.

Recent immigrants

Persons who did not have a job during the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, but who have worked since January 1, 2015, should answer questions 30 to 35 for the last job they held, even if it was in another country, and continue with questions 36 to 47.

Question 48) In 2015, did this person pay for child care, such as day care or babysitting, so that this person could work at his or her paid job(s)?

Answer this question for each person aged 15 years and over.

For persons who paid for child care in order to work at a paid job in 2015:

  • mark “Yes” and enter the amount paid.

Only enter the full amount once, even if child care enabled more than one person to work at a paid job. You may split the amount between the payers if you choose. Do not include casual babysitting arrangements made for entertainment purposes.

For persons who did not pay for child care in order to work at a paid job:

  • mark “No”.

Question 49) In 2015, did this person pay child or spousal support payments to a former spouse or partner?

For persons who paid child or spousal support to a former spouse or partner in 2015:

  • mark “Yes” and enter the amount paid.

Only include support payments that were actually paid.

Do not include transfers of money or other gifts.

Report the total amount paid, not only the taxable portion.

For persons who did not pay child or spousal support to a former spouse or partner:

  • mark “No”.

Step F: Housing (Questions F1 to F10)

Questions F1 to F10 provide information to develop housing communities and projects.

Information on the number of rooms and bedrooms in homes and on housing costs is used to assess the economic situation of families. Governments use this information to measure levels of crowding within households and to develop housing programs.

Information on the age of dwellings and the need for repairs is used by municipalities to develop neighbourhood improvement programs.

Question F1) – Who pays the rent or mortgage, taxes, electricity, etc., for this dwelling?

  • Mark the person(s) who pays the rent, mortgage, taxes, electricity, etc., for this dwelling.

Question F2) – Is this dwelling owned or rented?

  • Mark “owned by you or a member of this household (even if it is still being paid for)” if you and/or another member of this household own the dwelling in which you live, even if the dwelling is on rented or leased land, if it is part of a condominium or if it is being paid for by you or another member of your household. If the household contains both owners and renters, such as a boarder, the dwelling should be considered owned.
  • Mark “rented (even if no cash rent is paid)” in all other cases, even if the dwelling you occupy is provided without cash rent or at a reduced rent (e.g., a clergy’s residence or a superintendent’s dwelling in an apartment building), or the dwelling is part of a co-operative.

Question F3) – Is this dwelling part of a condominium development?

  • Mark “Yes” if the dwelling is part of a condominium development. Include as condominiums those dwellings that are in the process of becoming registered condominiums.
  • Mark “No” if the dwelling is not part of a condominium development.

Question F4 a) – How many rooms are there in this dwelling?

  • Do not count any half-rooms (e.g., instead of “11⁄2”, enter “1” or “2”, depending on which best describes the dwelling).
  • If a room is partially divided by a fixed or movable partition, or has two parts used for different purposes, such as an L-shaped living and dining room, count it as two separate rooms.

Question F4 b) – How many of these rooms are bedrooms?

  • For a one-room dwelling or bachelor apartment, enter “0”.

Question F5) – When was this dwelling originally built?

To find out the age of the building:

  • ask the manager or superintendent in condominiums, large apartment blocks, or other rented dwellings
  • check your home insurance policies and documents about the purchase of the dwelling.

Question F6) – Is this dwelling in need of any repairs?

  • Regular maintenance means the normal activities continually being performed to prevent the dwelling from deteriorating, such as oiling hinges and replacing electrical fuses.
  • If some part of your dwelling is damaged, defective or not operating properly, mark “Yes, minor repairs are needed” or “Yes, major repairs are needed”.
  • Mark “Yes, major repairs are needed” if your dwelling needs critical repairs to electrical, heating or water systems, or to structures such as walls, floors, ceilings; or needs major replacements such as a new roof, or new external siding.
  • If your dwelling needs both minor and major repairs, mark only “Yes, major repairs are needed”.

Question F7) – Is this dwelling located on an agricultural operation that is operated by a member of this household?

  • Mark “Yes” if the dwelling is on an agricultural operation that is operated by a member of the household.
  • In all other situations, mark “No”.

Question F8 a) For this dwelling, what are the YEARLY payments (last 12 months) for electricity?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling. If the exact amount is not known, please give a best estimate.

  • If you have occupied this dwelling for less than a year, estimate and report the yearly amount based on either your payments up to this date or other available information.
  • For condominium owners, if electricity is included in the condominium fee, mark “Included in rent or other payments”.

Question F8 b) For this dwelling, what are the YEARLY payments (last 12 months) for oil, gas, coal, wood or other fuels?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling. If the exact amount is not known, please give a best estimate.

  • If you have occupied this dwelling for less than a year, estimate and report the yearly amount based on either your payments up to this date or other available information.
  • For condominium owners, if oil, gas, coal, wood, or other fuels are included in the condominium fee, mark “Included in rent or other payments”.
  • To estimate the total yearly cost of fuel, find the amount of fuel you consumed during the year (litres of oil, containers of propane gas, cords of wood or tons of coal) and multiply it by the average price per unit.

Question F8 c) For this dwelling, what are the YEARLY payments (last 12 months) for water and other municipal services?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling. If the exact amount is not known, please give a best estimate.

  • If you have occupied this dwelling for less than a year, estimate and report the yearly amount based on either your payments up to this date or other available information.
  • For condominium owners, if water and other municipal services are included in the condominium fee, mark “Included in rent or other payments”.

Question F9 a) What is the monthly rent paid for this dwelling?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling. If the exact amount is not known, please give a best estimate.

This question applies to renters only.

  • Enter the total rent paid by all household members for the dwelling you now occupy.
  • Include parking fees paid with rent, if any.

Question F9 b) Is this dwelling subsidized?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling.

This question applies to renters only.

  • Mark “Yes” if the dwelling is subsidized, otherwise mark “No”.

Question F10 a) What are the total regular monthly mortgage or loan payments for this dwelling?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling. If the exact amount is not known, please give a best estimate.

This question applies to owners only.

  • Where mortgage payments are made in increments other than monthly (e.g., biweekly), add all the payments made in the last 12 months and divide by 12 to calculate the average monthly payment.

Question F10 b) Are the property taxes (municipal and school) included in the amount shown in part a)?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling.

This question applies to owners only.

  • If municipal property taxes are included in the regular monthly mortgage payments reported in part a) and school taxes are not, mark “No” in part b) and report the annual school taxes in part c).

Question F10 c) What are the estimated yearly property taxes (municipal and school) for this dwelling?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling. If the exact amount is not known, please give a best estimate.

This question applies to owners only.

  • Property taxes include local improvement taxes, even if they are billed separately.

Question F10 d) If you were to sell this dwelling now, for how much would you expect to sell it?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling. If the exact amount is not known, please give a best estimate.

This question applies to owners only.

  • For a single dwelling, report the value of the entire property, including the land and any other detached structure on the property, such as a garage.
  • For a building that contains several dwellings, or that includes both residential and business premises, estimate the portion of the market value that applies only to the dwelling in which you live.

Question F10 e) What are the monthly condominium fees?

Answer this question for this dwelling even if you own or rent more than one dwelling. If the exact amount is not known, please give a best estimate.

This question applies to owners only.

  • If condominium fees are not paid in monthly installments, add all payments made in the last 12 months and divide the total by 12 to calculate the average monthly payment.
  • If the dwelling is not part of a condominium development, mark “None”.

Step G: Access to personal NHS information 92 years after the NHS (Question G1)

Question G1 provides each person with the opportunity to make an informed decision about what happens to his or her personal long-form information in 92 years. Consenting to the release of this information in 92 years will help future generations better understand the Canada of today, and will benefit historical, academic and genealogical research.

This question is for all persons listed on the questionnaire, including children younger than 15. If you are answering on behalf of other people, please consult each person.

Note: “National Household Survey” refers to the reinstated mandatory long-form census. To expedite the reinstatement of the mandatory long-form census, Statistics Canada is providing respondents with the paper questionnaire originally designed for the National Household Survey (NHS), as the 2016 Census long-form questionnaire.

Step G1) Does this person agree to make his or her 2016 National Household Survey information available in 2108 (92 years after the National Household Survey)?

This question is for all persons listed on the questionnaire, including children younger than 15. If you are answering on behalf of other people, please consult each person.

If a person’s view is not known, leave this question blank for that person.

For a child, only answer this question if agreement is given by his or her parent or legal guardian. If not known, leave this question blank for that person.

For a person legally unable to make a choice, legal guardians can answer on his or her behalf. If not known, leave this question blank for that person.

Step H

Thank you for your cooperation.

Date modified: